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  1. Formats and Editions of L'alchîmiste [thetwestperlnetself.cf]
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L'alchimista (Italian Edition) - Kindle edition by Paulo Coelho. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like. Alle frontiere tra il racconto da mille e una notte e l'apologo sapienziale, "L' Alchimista" è la storia di una iniziazione. Ne è protagonista Santiago, un giovane . Le Valchirie (Italian Edition) eBook: Paulo Coelho: thetwestperlnetself.cf: Kindle Store. e spirituale dell'autore all'indomani della pubblicazione dell'Alchimista.

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Lalchimista Paulo Coelho Ebook

Come il fiume che scorre (Italian Edition) eBook: Paulo Coelho: thetwestperlnetself.cf: Kindle-Shop. Paulo Coelho (Autor) . L'alchimista (Italian Edition). Paulo Coelho. book. Contribute to sarpongge/book development by creating an account on GitHub. Hippie (Italian Edition) eBook: Paulo Coelho: thetwestperlnetself.cf: Kindle Store. Hippie ( Italian Edition) by [Coelho, Paulo] L'alchimista (Italian Edition) · Paulo Coelho.

The Alchemist Portuguese: O Alquimista is a novel by Brazilian author Paulo Coelho that was first published in Originally written in Portuguese , it became a widely translated international bestseller. The Alchemist follows the journey of an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago. Believing a recurring dream to be prophetic , he asks a Romani fortune teller in a nearby town about its meaning. The woman interprets the dream as a prophecy telling the boy that he will discover a treasure at the Egyptian pyramids. Early into his journey, he meets an old king named Melchizedek , or the king of Salem, who tells him to sell his sheep, so as to travel to Egypt, and introduces the idea of a Personal Legend.

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Where did the saying come from: Huda Aweys It is not a new word, that Muslims have a verse in the Quran says that God created human to beings his successors in the land and make everything on …more It is not a new word, that Muslims have a verse in the Quran says that God created human to beings his successors in the land and make everything on the ground to obey us less. See all questions about L'Alchimista….

Formats and Editions of L'alchîmiste [thetwestperlnetself.cf]

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Sort order. I really disliked this book. I dislike it in the way that I dislike a great deal of modern self help books. Their basic message is that if you want something to happen, you need to want it as hard as you can, without caring about anything else, not allowing yourself to doubt it, or let criticisms will get in the way then it will happen.

I disagree with this notion, not only because it is false, but because it is bad. Just because we desire something, does not make it good. This idea of 'following I really disliked this book.

This idea of 'following your heart' is often wrong. Who are we to be the arbiters of truth? Why should our hearts be sources of information that go beyond logic, doubt and reasoning? Haven't we all desired things that have turned out to not be in our best interest, or to be harmful to others?

Andrew Jackson was a man known to have a lot of integrity. He was always 'true' to himself and followed his heart. Andrew Jackson is the man who initiated the 'Trail of Tears'.

Moving Native Americans from their homes and into reservations. Next, this idea of not letting ourselves doubt or consider doubts. This is a terrible and dishonest way to live. If we don't consider doubts, and entertain them often, then we are deliberately blinding ourselves. Deliberately making ourselves ignorant. If someone doesn't give serious consideration to the idea that they may be wrong.

Give serious thought to why they believe what they do, and that perhaps those who doubt them may be correct, then they are behaving in a dangerous and dishonest way. Not giving heed to the concerns doubts and criticisms of others is something I believe is a major fault in modern society. Often, people fail to recognize the needs of the group and the community. We place so much emphasis on the needs and rights of the individual.

This causes people to focus so much on themselves to the detriment of others around them. At times, it can be beneficial to go against the group, but one should first give serious consideration to the groups concerns. These are people who take a totally irrational stance, and stick to it as hard as they can in complete defiance to the views of everyone around them.

View all comments. I know that translation affects the quality of writing, but I could not get into this writing style. At all. I felt like it was totally affected and contrived. The parable-like quality was totally contrived, and I thought the "moral" was pretty stupid. Take chances. Follow your "personal legacy.

L'Alchimista

Granted, I am not religious. I think god-fearing people get more out of this bc they can take that leap of faith, excuse the phrase.

If this was supposed to be a story of magic, I may have been into it. But it was supposed to be a simple story of knowing yourself.

And I think, philosophically speaking, when you truly know yourself that is when you truly realize your destiny. Why do you need supernatural forces to convey that message?

This was about realizing your destiny, or "personal legacy. In short, the book attempted to be deep and failed. A character simply called "boy" and short sentences doesn't make a story a fable. Learning from your flocks and from nature doesn't make a character inexplicably wise.

I really got nothing out of this book. It is short though. The book came very highly recommended. Read it to judge the hype for yourself.

After all, a whole nation, including Bill Clinton who I'm into , thought it was a touching account that personally changed them. Then again, this is the same country who thought The Celestine Prophesy was worthwhile.

I need to start this review by stating 1 I can't stand self-help books and 2 I'm a feminist no, I don't hate men- some men are quite awesome, but I am very conscious of women and our place in the world.

Short summary mild spoilers: A boy named Santiago follows his 'Personal Legend' in traveling from Spain to the Pyramids in Egypt searching for treasure. Along the way, he learns 'the Language of the World' the 'Soul of the World' and discovers that the 'Soul of God' is 'his own soul. If you think they are hokey and silly, then you'll think this is a terrible book.

If you think statements such as "When you want something, all the universe conspires you to achieve it" and "All things are one" are moving and life-changing, you'll love this book. If such statements have you rolling your eyes, then this isn't your cup of tea. Its not that I find anything wrong with these messages.

They are important, but must be balanced with responsibility. In my experience, 'following your dreams' or personal legend is not the only way toward wisdom and strength.

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Is the person who struggles to put food on the table every day for his or her family, consciously realizing that he or she may not be following his or her 'personal legend' any less heroic than some traveler who leaves everything and everyone he or she is responsible for to go on a spiritual quest? Coelho comes close to labeling such people, as losers in life, which I find completely off the mark as some of these people have the most to offer in terms of wisdom. The issue of responsibility is also part of this book's sexism.

The main male characters in the novel have 'Personal Legends' - they are either seeking them, or have achieved them, or have failed to achieve them. But Coelho never mentions 'Personal Legend' with regard to women, other than to say that Fatima, Santiago's fiance, is 'a part of Santiago's Personal Legend.

Instead of traveling to find her dreams, she is content to sit around, do chores, and stare everyday at the desert to wait for his return. This is her 'fate' as a desert women. The fact that women don't have Personal Legends is even more galling considering the fact that according to Coelho, even minerals such as lead and copper have Personal Legends, allowing them to 'evolve' to something better ie, gold. In the ideal world presented in THE ALCHEMIST, it seems that the job of men is to seek out their personal legends, leaving aside thoughts of family and responsibility, and its the job of women to let them, and pine for their return.

Of course, someone has to do the unheroic, inconvenient work of taking care of the children, the animals, the elderly, the ill If everyone simply goes off on spiritual quests, deciding they have no responsibility other than to seek their Personal Legends, no one would be taking responsibility for the unglamorous work that simply has to take place for the world to run. On the other hand, what if both men and women are allowed to struggle towards their 'Personal Legends,' and help each other as best as they can towards them, but recognize that their responsibilities may force them to defer, compromise, or even 'sacrifice' their dreams?

This may seem depressing, but it isn't necessarily. Coelho seems to think that Personal Legends are fixed at childhood or at birth, or even before and are not changeable: But in my experience, many people have chosen to adjust, compromise, and even 'give up' on their dreams, only to find that life grants them something better, or they have a new, better dream to follow, a path providing greater wisdom.

View all 52 comments. Sarah Otto. Timing is everything. It deals in big, bold pronouncements of 'follow your dreams' et cetera et cetera, and it certainly makes you think about your own life and the pursuit of your own "Personal Legend" if you will. But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't downloading what Timing is everything.

But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't downloading what ' The Alchemist ' was selling.

It's a good, quick read, I'll give it that. I enjoyed myself, and I definitely thought a little bit about my own life in the process, which I appreciate from my literature. And while I was more or less with it for a while, I just couldn't stay on board with an ending that left me saying, "that's it? The whole book Santiago is in pursuit of his "Personal Legend", which he is told is a great treasure found in the pyramids of Egypt.

Along the way he befriends many people and makes a great sum of money, while also meeting a beautiful young woman who agrees to more or less be his life-partner, Romeo and Juliet -style which is stupid in and of itself, but more on that later. It is at this point that he determines he has achieved a greater treasure than any he had ever dreamed of, and would go no further.

Cue the music and themes of recognizing treasure in all its forms. Santiago has a wonderful, fulfilling life laid out before him, and would most likely die a happy man by the side of his lovely wife and adoring children, all while living comfortably as village counselor of a beautiful desert oasis.

Sounds pretty nice, no? Well, that's where the book lost it's footing. Santiago is urged, coerced even, into continuing to follow his "Personal Legend", leaving behind his "love" who, it should be mentioned is a "woman of the desert" and so is completely fine being abandoned by her "love" and will simply wait and wait and wait for him, whether he ever returns or not traversing the desert and bizarrely evading a hostile army along the way by turning himself into the wind it makes about as much sense as it sounds.

In the end though, Coelho reveals to us that Santiago does, indeed, reach his "Personal Legend" in a two and a half page epilogue, where it is shoddily revealed that Santiago's long-sought after treasure is Buried treasure. A box in the sand filled with gold coins and diamonds and jewelry and crowns, and all the other cliche treasure images you can think up.

What the hell? So what message are we supposed to take from this book then? Money is the most important thing in the world? Women are objects meant to be seen and valued for their beauty, there to serve you and wait around forever while you go on wild goose chases across continents in search of money?

Obviously I'm being facetious, and Coelho intended to say that one should follow their dreams no matter what, even if it transcends a nice, content life, so long as you are in pursuit of a life that would be even greater than you can ever imagine, sacrificing what is good now for what can be great later.

But he did so in an extremely simplistic way, and the revelation of the Santiago's treasure being literally treasure was a major disappointment.

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The thing was, despite his simplicity, the book had a nice message going for a while. If Fatima was Santiago's treasure, that I could have gotten behind, even if it shows a good deal of contempt for the role of women in relationships beauty being the most important factor in deciding on a mate, as Santiago is struck by her beauty and immediately professes his love; Fatima more or less acquiesces immediately and pledges herself to Santiago no matter what, even if he must travel the desert forever in selfish pursuit of his own dreams, with no regard for her , because that is something intangible that is meaningful and fulfilling, regardless of financial standing.

But then Coelho basically goes on to say that that is just a roadblock in the way of real achievement, and that one should selfishly pursue their own dreams with no regard for those closest to them.

How a book can go on and on talking about seeing the everyday symbols and omens in life and taking heed of them, presumably leaving metaphors for life all along the way, and then have what was presumably the biggest metaphor of them all, Santiago's treasure, turn out not to be a metaphor at all, but just money? To me, that summed up everything. I suppose Coelho realizes this, as he begins the book with a brief fable about Narcissus falling into the river because he loved staring at his reflection, and the river's disappointment in this, as the river loved gazing into Narcissus's eyes and seeing the reflection of itself.

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This is a horrible little story implying that everyone is obsessed only with themselves, a sad, empty little thought that Coelho spends pages endorsing wholeheartedly, under the guise of following your dreams. I understand that other people love this book and find it inspiring, and I think I would have felt the same way years ago, when I was just out of college and it appeared I had my whole life ahead of me and a lifetime to live it.

I'm older now, and I've found someone who I consider to be a real treasure, and while I still have dreams, I'm not willing to sacrifice the happiness that this life brings me every day in a single-minded pursuit of something that I want for selfish reasons fame, fortune, etc. If I was Santiago, I would have never left Fatima in the first place if she truly made me happy, as Santiago claimed she did. Perhaps that makes me a coward in Coelho's eyes, not unlike the Crystal merchant from the story.

But it'd also make me not the sad Englishman, whose single-minded pursuit of his "personal legend" had cost him all his money, friends, and family and left him alone in an oasis burning lead in a tent in the vain hopes it will turn to gold.

I guess what I'm trying to say in this long-winded review, is that this book is all about being selfish and doing what you think will make you happy, regardless of everything else. I can see why that appeals to people, especially those who want to show the doubters and find their own treasure beneath a sycamore tree, but it's sad, in a way.

We live in a culture where everyone wants selfish things like fame or money or power, just to satisfy some gaping hole in their own souls, ignoring the real problems that lead to these compulsions in the first place. Retrieved December 20, The Guardian. Retrieved January 27, The New York Times. Retrieved January 28, March June 27, May 18, July 22, June 5, Retrieved September 30, Words Into Pictures". Retrieved January 29, Archived from the original on July 11, Retrieved January 20, July 14, Retrieved December 12, — via YouTube.

Retrieved January 30, Works by Paulo Coelho. Jean Giraud. Little Nemo: Authority control BNF: Retrieved from " https: Hidden categories: Namespaces Article Talk.